Beach food for hungry surfers. Surf and turf downunder.

Surf: The point break at Wategos Beach in Byron Bay is a longboarder’s dream come true: The mellow wave breaks 150 days a year, and the sand and flat rocks underneath make for gentle wipeouts. Weekdays are blissfully uncrowded, but weekends and holidays get hairy. Luckily, Aussie surfers are the friendliest in the world—there are so many great waves along their coasts, they know there’s more than enough for all.

Steve Mills surfing Wategos beach in the Byron Easter Classic

Wategos Beach, Byron Bay, Australia

Turf: You’ll find the Byron at Byron Resort and Spa on a 45-acre nature preserve a ten-minute drive from Wategos Beach. The food is fancy at this poolside Mod Oz alfresco restaurant, though the vibe and dress code are not. And you’ll be glad you made the effort to seek it out once you’re digging into freshly shucked Sydney rock oyster with Vietnamese dressing or the brodetto seafood broth with Yamba king prawns, Kinkawooka mussels, scallops, and reef fish. There’s a wide selection of Australian wines (never had a bad one yet), and be sure to leave room for dessert: buttermilk panna cotta with roasted rhubarb.

The Byron at Byron Resort, Australia

Visit the Byron at Byron Resort here

For other destinations around the world, click here to visit the experts at Concierge.com

World’s sexiest hotel room views. 7 great reasons to stay in bed.

Wild passion, honeymoon-worthy heat, starry-eyed romance. Whatever your desires, there’s an easy way to turn up the intensity of your next trip for two: Book a hotel room with one of the world’s sexiest views.

Leopard Hills, Sabi Sands Private Game Reserve, South Africa

Blanket Bay, Glenorchy, New Zealand

Loi Suites, Iguazú Hotel, Puerto Iguazú, Argentina

To find out more, click on www.concierge.com/ideas.

Beauty. Eroticism. Humour. Helmut Newton Exhibition @ Grand Palais Paris.

Helmut Newton

Grand Palais, Southeast gallery

24 March 2012 – 17 June 2012

Helmut Newton 1975. French Vogue. YSL

Since Helmut Newton’s death (1920 – 2004), there has been no retrospective of his work in France, although he did much of his work there, particularly for the French edition of Vogue. Provocative, sometimes shocking, Newton’s work tried to capture the beauty, eroticism, humour – and sometimes violence – that he sensed in the social interaction within the familiar worlds of fashion, luxury, money and power. For more information about the exhibition click here to visit the official website.